Español, SÍ

A blog dedicated to the beautiful Spanish language and the many cultures that surround it. Hispanic literature, music, films, history, culture, comedy, and everything in between. Español, SÍ.


Un blog dedicado al bello idioma del español y las muchas culturas alrededor de él. Literatura hispanica, música, películas, historia, cultura, comedia y todo lo que sobra. Español, SÍ.
Contributing Authors

fuckyeahenchiladas:

”La Banda”  Chapultepec Road, 1969

(vía traeme-lasestrellas)

badassmexicans:

Words to live by.

(vía lasfloresdemayo)

bendita-cerveza:

asvpangelaa:

enddlesslivinlove:

The song of the people 😩

Por tu maldito amor..

Pa Las Borracheras 💔

(vía lasfloresdemayo)

sleepynegress:

asylum-art:

This Artist Gustavo Silva Nuñez Not Only Creates Incredible Paintingsof Swimmers, He Also Interacts with Them!

Gustavo Silva Nuñez is a Venezuela-based artist who not only creates incredibly realistic paintings of swimmers, but also pose with them (mostly while creating them) in such a way that makes it seem like he’s actually interacting with the person in the painting.

I was literally like…Why does this dude keeping trying to put a paintbrush on these swimming people’s foreheads??

And then:

image

(vía krystlenotcrystal)

Four decades after Salvadorans began arriving on Long Island, they are gaining political empowerment

Last September, Salvadoran Mónica R. Martínez beat legislator Rick Montano by a large margin (64-36 percent). Montano had occupied the seat for District 9 (which includes Brentwood, Central Islip and North Bay Shore) for a decade.

Martínez, 36, is the younger sister of Antonio Martínez, council member for the city of Babylon and the first Salvadoran elected to hold office in the state of New York.

“My parents had two jobs, and went to night school to learn English. Our only time together was at dinner,” said Ms. Martínez, who was a teacher for 10 years and later became assistant principal at the East Middle School in Brentwood.

The brother and sister, two of four siblings, came to the United States as children to reunite with their parents – a lumber salesman and a hygienist. The couple had emigrated from El Salvador and settled on Long Island in 1982, fleeing civil war.

“Mom left me with my grandmother for a year. The separation made my family hang on to very strong values, especially unity,” said the legislator.

comoespinademaguey:

Pueblos indígenas en México

Ubicación en el país.

trocitosgraficos:

#DíaMundialDeLaArepa - A donde vamos… llevamos a Venezuela en el corazón

trocitosgraficos:

Festival de Cine Latinoamericano de Vancouver